Anamcgary's Blog

Leadership thoughts from PeopleFirst HR

Leadership Development – Company Differentiator

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One of the biggest differentiators of companies that excel in leadership development is the commitment and ownership of the CEO or top executive.  It’s easy for a CEO to just pay lip service to leadership development. All they need to do is show up at the annual talent review and nod their heads; stop by a few training programs to give a quick talk, approve the training budget, and read the script written for them by HR that tells them to say, “People are our more important assets” at every employee gathering.

You can tell what’s really important to them by taking a look at their calendar to see where they spend their time, the agenda items on their executive team meetings, and by what gets measured.

So when it comes to leadership development, what’s the difference between a CEO that is just “involved” and one that is really committed?

I for one think the following 7 things would give any CEO the best return on their time invested. The good news is that none of these involve spending much money, and you may already be doing many of them:

Focus on results and don’t let the process be the tail wagging the dog.

I’ve seen way too many organizations get caught up in the process and lose sight of the results. They create complicated processes and forms, thick binders, have long meetings, and put way too much importance on impressing their board of directors. Once the meeting is over, the binder gets set aside and nothing happens until the next year. VPs and senior managers soon catch on that it’s nothing but an exercise and focus on looking good instead of being good.  This doesn’t mean the annual CEO and board reviews are not important — it’s been my experience that if you don’t do this, then nothing happens. Events, like annual check-ups, force things to happen that otherwise get pushed aside because they are not urgent.

Have high expectations for the head of HR.

The CEO’s HR partner not only needs to know all of the best practices and processes, but they must have the ability to influence and be trusted by the executive team as well as be the CEO’s trusted adviser on talent. It’s a tough balance — they may be coaching a struggling VP one day and recommending to the CEO the same VP be replaced the next day. They have to be able to play match-maker and broker job changes, and manage all of the ego and politics involved.

Practice what you preach.

Committed CEOs publicly work on their own leadership development, then work on the development of their executive team. They coach them, give them feedback, and develop individual development plans with them. They support their development. A CEO’s behaviors are powerful — they set the expectations for the rest of the management team, creating a trickle-down effect of leadership development.

Be the Chief Talent Broker

While there are challenges to cross-functional movement of high potentials, somehow the companies best at leadership development figure out how to do it without damaging the business and ruining careers. They intentionally move their high potentials from job to job to get them ready for bigger jobs.

If it’s left up to each manager, it won’t happen. Why should they? It’s certainly not in their best interests to give up their best talent. The CEO is the only one (other than the HR vice president) looking at leadership development from a what’s best for the company, long-range perspective. Managers won’t do it — or even see value in it — unless the CEO establishes it as an expectation and encourages them to give up their top talent and be willing to accept (and develop) unlikely developmental candidates.

Spend time assessing talent.

Assessing talent is all about having regular talent reviews, conducting formal assessments, and spending time with high-potentials. Know what to look for, too — indicators of success in larger roles isn’t the same as performance in a current role. Astute CEOs know how to ask the questions, what behaviors to look for, and the difference between performance (results) and leadership potential.

Hold others accountable for assessing and developing future leaders.

All too often companies will conduct talent reviews and succession plan reviews and discuss development and then, a year later, nothing happens. A CEO needs to establish the vision, set meaningful goals, measure them, and hold people accountable. It takes time to change a culture, but a few public coronations and hangings help send the message that it’s important.

Take decisive action on underperformers

Entrenched underperformers block the development and advancement of an organization’s high potentials.  Leaders don’t always do a good job differentiating excellent performance for mediocre performance (everybody’s a B or A, and nobody’s a C), and they are too slow to take action.

Author: anamcgary

Ana McGary is a seasoned Human Resources and business professional with over 25 years of human resources management and executive leadership experience in Fortune 500 organizations, large and small companies in various industries. Ana is a results oriented HR Business consultant who offers business leaders and executives human resources and business guidance and solutions that enable them to grow and retain their employees and customers. She founded PeopleFirst Enterprises, Inc. in April 2010. PeopleFirst offers human resources practices, guidance and outsourcing services to emerging, small and midsize businesses in the Southeast market. In today’s changing world, capital is scarce. Because PeopleFirst is smaller than some of its larger competitors, we are able to provide similar services that are not pre-packaged and are designed to meet the business needs of each customer at a significantly lower expense. Ana’s areas of expertise include all aspects of human resources management, employment and labor laws, leadership development, multi-site operational management, operational policies, processes and procedures, staff performance optimization, benefits/compensation design, merger/acquisitions integration, and management and executive coaching. Her passions include organizational effectiveness, leadership coaching & development, facilitating individuals, teams and organizations to reach their maximum performance. She has written several articles for business publications and speaks at several conferences throughout the year. Ana has consistently been recognized by her customers as an exceptional communicator and professional adviser. Ana maintains her Professional Human Resources certification as well as her Paralegal certification requirements. She is an active member of The Society for Human Resources Management, nationally and within several southeast chapters. She is also a member of the International Coach Federation and the Georgia Coach Federation. Ana serves as a Board Member for It’s the Journey, Inc. A Georgia based charitable organization and producers of The Atlanta 2-Day Walk for Breast Cancer. She is also a member of the Georgia Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and is fluent in Spanish. PeopleFirst’s approach to Human Resources is partnering with executives, presidents, vice presidents, directors and business owners in managing the human side of the ever changing world of business. We combine creative strategy with tactical leadership to help organizations meet their desired business objectives.

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